Classic EssaysWilliam Pierce

Two Worlds, Not One

jung_freud

by Dr. William L. Pierce

THE GREAT Swiss pioneer in psychology and psychiatry, Carl Gustav Jung (1875–1961), was a contemporary of the Jewish “psychoanalyst,” Sigmund Freud (1856–1939). (ILLUSTRATION: The unending war: Western science vs. Jewish charlatanry; Jung, left, and Freud)

Initially Jung found merit in some of Freud’s early work in psychiatry, but he did not hesitate to withdraw his endorsement of Freud when the latter deviated more and more from a scientific approach to the study of the human mind and instead began attempting to popularize various kinky sexual theories. Finally Freud abandoned science altogether for unabashed charlatanry and accumulated a fortune in Vienna by explaining to wealthy, neurotic Jews that their problems were rooted in a suppressed desire to have sexual intercourse with their mothers — or, in the case of his female patients, in their subconscious disappointment at being born without penises.

Jung then began to understand that Freud’s peculiar interpretation of man’s nature was not an entirely arbitrary thing but was rooted in his Jewishness. Freud’s fascination with unnatural sex and the willingness of his Jewish patients to accept his theories both had a racial basis — as did also, for example, the Talmud’s obsessive preoccupation with the same subject.

Jung came to realize that the mental world of the Jew and the mental world of the European were two entirely different worlds. He hinted at this when he said: “We cannot help being prejudiced by our ancestors, who want to look at things in a certain way, and so we instinctively have certain points of view. I would be neurotic if I saw things in another way than my instinct tells me to do. . . . I cannot say I have a Freudian psychology, because I never had such difficulties in relation to desires. As a boy I lived in the country and took things very naturally, and the natural and unnatural things of which Freud speaks were not interesting to me. The talk of an incest complex just bores me to tears.”

Jung’s insight into the nature of neurosis has particular meaning for us today. He said, “I know exactly how I could make myself neurotic: If I said or believed something that is not myself.” If this offers us a clue as to why Jung could not accept Freud’s point of view, it is also a clue as to why our entire Western world — steeped as it is in alien spiritual, cultural, and political concepts — is so neurotic.

  * * *

From Attack! No. 66, 1978, transcribed by Anthony Collins and edited by Vanessa Neubauer, from the book The Best of Attack! and National Vanguard, edited by Kevin Alfred Strom

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Anthony Collins
Anthony Collins

In The Undiscovered Self, Carl Gustav Jung wrote: “Everywhere in the West there are subversive minorities who, sheltered by our humanitarianism and our sense of justice, hold the incendiary torches ready, with nothing to stop the spread of their ideas except the critical reason of a single, fairly intelligent, mentally stable stratum of the population.”

Subversive minorities sheltered by an indiscriminate humanitarianism and sense of justice, bent upon destruction, intoxicating their hosts with poisonous ideas . . . it almost sounds like Jung was referring to the Jews and their ethnic and ideological auxiliaries.