Classic EssaysCosmotheismWilliam Pierce

WLP86: William Pierce on Christianity

In honor of the 86th anniversary of William Luther Pierce’s birth: In this 1982 article, Dr. Pierce offers his perspective on the religion that came to dominate our culture for more than ten centuries.

by Dr. William L. Pierce

THE NATIONAL Office has received a few complaints (fewer than expected) from members about what has been perceived as an anti-Christian bias in recent issues of National Vanguard (NV). One member has resigned.

The complaints fall into two general categories: 1. “I am a Christian. Why are you attacking my religion?” and 2. “I am not a Christian, but many White people are. We must all stick together. To attack Christianity is divisive.”

It should first be noted that the National Alliance is not primarily a religious organization — at least, not in the usual sense of the word, although most members are able to recognize the strong spiritual element in the Alliance’s message. Second, it should be noted that the National Office is fully aware of the sensitive nature of the Christian religion, and for that reason NV avoided the question for a long time.

This avoidance, however, was in conflict with the Alliance’s fundamental obligation to deal forthrightly with all issues of vital concern to the welfare and progress of our race. This obligation where Christianity is concerned has become especially difficult to ignore during the past few months, with the growing strength of the Moral Majority and other right-wing Christian groups and their active participation in political matters. The leader of that organization, the Reverend Jerry Falwell, has been outspoken in his support of Zionism, and he was recently given a Zionist award by Jewish leaders. There exists a clear conflict of interests for any Alliance member who supports such an organization, and the Alliance member should not compromise in matters of this sort.

This is not the place to deal at length with details of religious history and doctrine; NV will continue to have articles on these topics from time to time, and there will be such an article in the April issue. Here, however, a few things will be mentioned briefly for the guidance of Alliance members.

The most important single fact concerning Christianity with which the Alliance must deal is that all the major Christian churches, Catholic and Protestant, liberal and fundamentalist, have openly aligned themselves with the enemies of the White race. The Catholics and the liberal Protestants are vigorously supporting racial mixing, while the fundamentalist Protestants are strong boosters of Zionism. These alignments will become increasingly important factors in our struggle in the years ahead, as the churches become more and more involved in social and political issues. The Jews have already announced their intention to mobilize fundamentalist Christians in their effort to maintain control of the U.S. government. The Alliance cannot remain silent in the face of such developments, for the sake of White unity or anything else.

No honest, conscientious Alliance member can maintain his membership in the Alliance and also in an organization which is fundamentally opposed to the goals and principles of the Alliance. The former member who belongs to the Moral Majority acted correctly in resigning from the Alliance, and the same applies to others: Any Alliance member who is also a member of a church or other Christian organization which supports racial mixing or Zionism should decide now where he stands, and he should then resign either from his church or from the Alliance.

In fact, the great majority of Alliance members who originally had some Christian church affiliation have already made their decisions and left the churches. Those members who continue to consider themselves Christians either have no church affiliation or belong to very small, independent churches which have pro-White doctrines. It is primarily these members who have objected to the recent treatment of Christianity in NV. “It’s all right to attack the big churches,” they say, “because those churches have been subverted by the Jews — but don’t attack Christianity itself. What the churches are preaching today isn’t really Christianity.”

Well, far be it from the National Alliance to decide what is really Christianity. Christians have been fighting with one another over that question for the better part of the last 2,000 years without arriving at an answer acceptable to all parties concerned. From a strictly practical viewpoint, however, we must use the word “Christianity” in NV in the sense in which it is understood by the general public and by the great majority of readers. In that sense, “Christianity” means the lumped together doctrines of the major Christian churches, without regard for all the little quibbles which separate Catholics from Protestants, or ultra-liberal Presbyterians from Holy Rollers and teetotaling Baptists.

Beyond this question of whether it is the race-mixers and Zionists or the pro-Whites who are the real Christians, there are the troubling issues of the non-European origin of Christianity: of the great body of Christian ethical doctrines which are accepted by nearly all the churches but which conflict with White spirituality and the needs for White survival, such as the Sermon on the Mount; and of the body of Old Testament and its Jewish mythology — such as the creation myth of Genesis; the “chosen people” myth, and Isaiah’s ravings against all non-Jews, together with his prophecies that the Jews will eventually rule the world and all other races will serve them — which comes along with most versions of Christianity.

All three of the aforementioned issues are relevant to the mission of the National Alliance, and they cannot be ignored: We must look to our racial roots, and we must rid ourselves of alien influences, including those from the Levant; we must govern ourselves by White values and ethical doctrines, and by no others; and we must concern ourselves with truth alone.

A number of men and women who have understood the first two of these issues but who have, nevertheless, still considered themselves both Christian and pro-White have attempted to resolve the contradiction by denying the Jewish origins of Christianity and by choosing interpretations of Christian ethical doctrines which differ markedly from the commonly accepted ones. They have asserted that not only was Jesus not a Jew, but neither were the people living in Palestine during the Old Testament and the New Testament periods Jews. These people, they say, were actually the ancestors of the Anglo-Saxons and other peoples of Europe.

One can argue either way about Jesus, because the historical evidence is insufficient to support a firm conclusion. But the assertion that the people of the Old Testament or the people of Palestine among whom the Christian movement began were Anglo-Saxons, or anything but Semites, for the most part, is demonstrably false. Such assertions can only be maintained by persons who close their eyes to the clear historical record, just as a belief in the creation myth of Genesis can only be maintained by persons who refuse to accept the clear scientific evidence to the contrary.

If, despite everything above, there are Alliance members or prospective Alliance members who still consider themselves Christians, then it must be in the sense that they value the specifically White elements of Christianity which have been added since its origins — the great art, the great music, and the great architecture produced by White men during the centuries in which the Christian churches ruled Europe — and that they also share the White spiritual feelings which have been eloquently expressed by many men and women who were Christians and who applied the adjective “Christian” to feelings which, in fact, came from deep within the White race-soul and existed long before the advent of the Christian church.

Such Christians we can call our comrades and be proud to have in our ranks.

* * *

Source: National Alliance BULLETIN (1982)

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Will W. Williams, National Alliance ChairmanfodwellKevin Alfred StromdanArvin N. Prebost Recent comment authors
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Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost

The Jesus-figure in the mosaic is showing a hand-gesture that is typically Buddhist. I wonder if this is a fairly modern mosaic or an ancient one? If ancient, could it be an indication, simply a suggestion, that Buddhist monks were indeed active in the land of Palestine, 2,000 years ago?

dan
dan

There were trade networks between India and the Roman empire, with Roman coins being found India. I also know there is evidence of Buddhist monks in Alexandria before Christ. I couldn’t remember what that evidence was, so I did a search for Buddhism and Alexandria, and found a Wikipedia page on Buddhism in the Roman world, which had an interesting map of ancient trade routes at the top. St. Christopher is probably modeled on a Buddhist figure who has a very similar name and function (protector of travelers), and I also recall that it explained the strange description of the saint as “dog-headed.” I couldn’t locate any information on that however. As to the gesture, the one typically made by the Buddha is a yoga pose, with the thumb and… Read more »

Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost

Very interesting, dan. Thanks for the info!

Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost

Further research has revealed that this is a Byzantine mosaic.

Will W Williams
Will W Williams

Who cares what that mosaic image of the supposed “King of the Jews” represents? I believe you gentlemen missed the point of Dr. Pierce’s message to his Alliance members in that 37-year-old NA internal BULLETIN: Any Alliance member who is also a member of a church or other Christian organization which supports racial mixing or Zionism should decide now where he stands, and he should then resign either from his church or from the Alliance. I would add to that: any NA member who is also a member of a church or other Christian organization which supports same sex marriage or that welcomes members of the LGBT community as members should decide where he stands, and he should then resign from his church or from the Alliance. That is being… Read more »

dan
dan

“Who cares what that mosaic image of the supposed “King of the Jews” represents?” I do. Because, like Faust, I wish to know everything. It also appears to be derived from yoga, thus from an Aryan source. Being Byzantine, it is also likely the product of Aryan hands as well. What then of Notre Dame, if we are to dismiss every work associated with Christianity? “I believe you gentlemen missed the point of Dr. Pierce’s message to his Alliance members in that 37-year-old NA internal BULLETIN:” I missed nothing. I have been explicitly non-Christian since I was 9 years old. That was when I learned enough of it to know it was incompatible with my values. Whether you like it or not, Christianity is a fact of our history, and… Read more »

Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost

I think Dan is right, Will. Going down side-streets, if one wants to call it that, can lead to surprising discoveries. This was no slight to the writings of Dr. Pierce.

I have read that Buddha was an Aryan. I have read the Dhammapada and I think it makes great sense, but it could be seen as fatalistic. But I see it as Faustian and triumphalist.

I have often wondered why, if Buddha was an Aryan, and Buddhist missionaries were active in the middle-east, why we got struck with Christianity? I would think that Buddhism would be more compatible with the Aryan spirit, very compatible with Stoicism.

dan
dan

“I have read that Buddha was an Aryan.” Indeed he was. Prince Siddhartha Gautama was from northern India, which is traditionally Aryan (as opposed to the Dravidian south). As a prince, he was a Kshattriya, a member of the warrior caste. When he departed the palace for the last time, he renounced the world by cutting off his hair with his sword. “I have read the Dhammapada and I think it makes great sense, but it could be seen as fatalistic. But I see it as Faustian and triumphalist.” I considered myself an atheist much of my life, but I seem always to have sought spirituality. I remember that Buddhism in particular, but also some Hindu ideas, appealed to me. I knew really nothing of the Aryans then. Being a… Read more »

Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost

I very much enjoy reading your take on this, Dan. I think we are probably kindred spirits.

What was that book by Devi that talked about Buddha? “The Lightning and the Sun”?

dan
dan

That’s the book, one of my absolute favorites. Available from Cosmotheist Books, in fact. Just for popularizing that, Dr. Pierce has my eternal gratitude. As I get older, I experience things I’ve read about, but never quite understood. For instance, I now know what it is like to be in love with a dead woman.

I have always thought the way that she expressed in Impeachment Of Man, which I could have written myself, albeit in a less erudite fashion. When I began to really become religious, my thoughts began to follow more the paths expressed in Lightning And The Sun (well, at least the paths I hadn’t already trod). There is only an iota of difference between us.

JM/Iowa
JM/Iowa

Great. Wonderful. Thanks for sharing your thoughts about everything except the mission of the National Alliance- the underlying purpose for the article above.

JM/Iowa
JM/Iowa

So what’s all this esoterica regarding christinsanity worth to us here at NV? This cult has opened up Aryans to huge problems in the nations we’ve built up leading it to the destruction of the fundamental and most important building block of our society: our racial health.

The desire to know everything is Faustian, but without getting to the essential worth of this knowledge is a failure as our people are confused enough with this as among other thingsand need better guidance regarding these things. Your information might be useful to scholars researching for publication, but put here without a Cosmotheist perspective? Pointless and wasteful of NV readers time.

Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost

Well, JM, why and how did our ancestors become Christians? What appealed to them about it; that is, what was lacking in paganism? Or were they really Christians? Were they still pagan with a gloss of Christian doctrine, as James Russell (“The Germanization of Early Medieval Christianity”) maintains?

There are different personality types—sensory and intuitive. The sensory just wants the nuts-and-bolts of things, without going further; the intuitive wants to see the connections—this nut used to go on this bolt. Why? And this bolt, if it were hollow, would be a pipe. Could a nut join two pipes together? If not, what would?

Both types are necessary for a civilization to be maintained, and also to progress.

Not pointless or wasteful at all.

JM/Iowa
JM/Iowa

Fire and sword is how it came to dominate, scholarly treatises came afterwards–probably because it paid the smarter ones and allowed them out of the daily toil of agricultural and other forms of manual labor. That Aryans put their own stamp on it makes it no less a creed of Semitic origin and flavor.

But the esoterica (yoga poses, really?) involved when going down this rabbit hole isn’t about joining metallic hardware, metaphorically or otherwise. It’s trivia.

dan
dan

“So what’s all this esoterica regarding christinsanity worth to us here at NV?” I am convinced you did not read anything I wrote. Yes, Christianity touched off this discussion because of the use of an Aryan yoga pose, and then came up again in the question of how it came to dominate, something that is of great relevance here, I would think. You want to complain about the disease, but not wonder how it was contracted? You don’t think that’s relevant? Frankly, I know next to nothing about Christian esoterica. If you had actually read what I wrote, you would know I am, and always have been, interested in Aryan religion. The vast majority of what I wrote about was Aryan. Aryan religion, Aryan thought. How are Buddhism, Mithraism, and… Read more »

JM/Iowa
JM/Iowa

I read your rambling discourse before touching the keyboard. Now I can’t get that time back. “Aryan yoga pose” as a key dominating influence among our people indeed! What’s next, finding a sublime Aryan connection to phallic symbols in art? As I mentioned to Arvin Prebost above, this is trivia.

Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost

JM, it sounds like you need to go into “the Plough” yoga posture, ASAP! Relax, and assume a reflective, inquiring mood. What I am interested in right now is the “resurrected Jews.” The book of Matthew says that, at the moment of Jesus’ death, “saints” from the Old Testament days were resurrected “and went into the Holy City and appeared to many.” So, I am wondering, Where did they get their clothes? Their food? Their money? Can you imagine this caravan of naked, starving Jews, wandering in from the desert, asking everybody if they “know Jesus”? This must have been especially hard for the women “saints” among them! As far as I now know, neither Josephus or anyone else mentions what must have been quite a remarkable event. And where… Read more »

Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost

Yes, Kevin, I was needling him.

It sounds as if you would be open to accepting articles from dan and I? That is an attractive offer.

Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost

Thanks, Kevin, I will work on that. I will watch my grammar more closely, and not say things like, “from Dan and I.” I guess I am indeed getting older, slipping a bit.

Will W. Williams, National Alliance Chairman
Will W. Williams, National Alliance Chairman

What a shame to close comments under one of Dr. Pierce’s most seminal commentaries to his members from 37 years ago. When I was the National Alliance’s Membership Coordinator 27 years ago and found this piece I condensed it to a one-page flier and distributed hundreds of them to potential Alliance members to state and make clear our position on Christianity. The quote I put up five days ago, above, in bold, was the most honest policy statement I had seen to date, coming from a pro-White leader, and I knew that WLP’s honest approach would resonate with others as it did with me. When the Internet fell into our lap in the mid-nineties I transcribed and digitized it to share with thousands more people who were looking for an honest… Read more »

Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost

Will, while I cannot join the Alliance, I will send a contribution, very soon. Sorry I neeedled JM, but I must admit, I thought the naked Jew thing was quite funny!

I study the Dhammapada for personal reasons. It says:

“And if you cannot master yourself,
The harm you do turns against you
Grievously.”

and

“All things pass away
But the awakened are awake
Forever.”

dan
dan

Rambling? Ok, I’ll grant you that, some of it at least surely wasn’t my best writing, and I didn’t much like it myself, but I was trying to convey information, in a timely manner, and didn’t give it the time I would normally like to. I’m typically a perfectionist, but if I deliberate too much, sometimes I’d never finish, always finding room for improvement. Because of that, I can also see how at least some of it might seem like trivia. Indeed some of it, like the bit about the Buddha cutting his hair with a sword, was trivia, even though I was trying to highlight his warrior background. The fact that the Buddha was an Aryan, given his historical significance, and the ethical system that came from him, that… Read more »

fodwell
fodwell

I don’t want any preachers, cops, politicians or federal agents in my house. I know what side my bread is buttered.