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Japan: Schools Now Allowed to Use Mein Kampf as Teaching Material

Japanese nationalist “Imperial Rescript on Education” now allowed to be used also — under terms that neither will be used to “promote racial hatred.”

THE JAPANESE schooling system has okayed using Mein Kampf, Hitler’s autobiography and National Socialist manifesto, in schools for educational purposes just weeks after the similarly controversial Imperial Rescript on Education was approved as “teaching material,” according to media reports.

Although the Japanese government approved Hitler’s infamous book as “teaching material” for schools on Friday, using it to promote racial hatred will lead to a strict response from regulators, according to the Japan Times report.

The decision came weeks after the controversial Imperial Rescript on Education in schools was approved for the same purposes.

According to many historians, the Rescript, which focuses on patriotism and loyalty to the Japanese Emperor, was one of the primary sources promoting obedience and moral certitude that helped militarism to grow in Japan.

It was issued in 1890 to expound the government’s policy on teaching the Japanese Empire’s guiding principles and it was subsequently distributed to all of the country’s schools, along with a portrait of Emperor Meiji. Schoolchildren were obliged to learn and recite it from time to time.

Following Japan’s surrender and the end of World War II, American occupation authorities banned formal reading of the Rescript.

“Use of the Imperial Rescript on Education as teaching material cannot be denied,” Japan’s cabinet said in a statement on March 31 this year.

The Imperial Rescript came into the limelight earlier this year after a video emerged showing three- to five-year-old pupils at an Osaka kindergarten reciting the long-defunct document. The video sparked heated discussion in Japanese society and angered the Chinese, who suffered the most at the hands of Japan’s imperial forces. China lost between 15 and 20 million people during the war, the majority of whom were civilians.

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Source: Defend Europa

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4 Comments

  1. May 4, 2017 at 8:55 pm — Reply

    Wow. Any non-communist government anywhere in the world today that supports patriotism in education is a rare thing. Good for them. The Jews are almost certainly planning their counterattack. What will it be? Economic disaster? Political assassination? Racism hoaxes? It’s interesting that the Rescript was stripped from their national education right after WWII, most likely an attempt at weakening Japanese identity. In similar fashion just a few years later, U.S. schools would be forcibly integrated for the same reasons, to weaken identity.

  2. cc
    May 4, 2017 at 10:35 pm — Reply

    Japan has been under heavy occupation from 1945 forward. It sounds like the Federals are throwing the Japanese a bone by allowing Hitler’s book to be distributed. Germany suffers from Federal occupation too. Can they read Hitler’s book too?

    The Federals hate the Dixie flag more than MEIN KAMPF. And that is why the South has been a conquered Province from 1865 forward.

    South Korea is also under heavy occupation, but the Federal intriguers have those people believing it’s Shangri-La.

  3. Achim Wolfrum
    May 10, 2017 at 3:50 am — Reply

    @cc
    In Gemany “Mein Kampf” is allowed to be printed, and has been since two Years or so ago. But of course they don’t use it in schools to teach children.

    Greetings from Germany

  4. cc
    May 10, 2017 at 10:58 am — Reply

    Good to know, Achim Wolfrum. If Hitler’s book is coming out of Jewish publishing houses, it’s probably edited including reckless paraphrarses.

    Greetings from the Southern nation

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