Posts Tagged

Richard Wagner

Essays

by Hadding Scott “It became obvious that even the poorest folk-comrade was devoted to his nation, although he had never been conscious of it as his property. He knew nothing about the cultural merits of his country; he knew the names Wagner, Beethoven, Mozart, Goethe, Kant, and Schopenhauer…
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Classic Essays

HOW TRUE were the accusations made by Richard Wagner in his famous article “Judaism in Music”? Was the theory of disproportionate Jewish influence realistic? Or was it the myth that Jewish apologists would have us believe? Ernest Newman’s four-volume biography of Wagner gives…
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Classic Essays

INTERPRETATION, the element that give a particular flavor to music, can be the difference between a good and a bad performance. When the interpretation is distorted for whatever reason, a wholesale alteration of the composition occurs. There are built-in constraints to distortion in instrumental…
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Essays

by Michael J. Polignano RECENTLY I WENT to the San Francisco Opera’s new production of Richard Wagner’s The Flying Dutchman (Der Fliegende Holländer), and I thought I would share my reactions, since they relate to larger issues. (ILLUSTRATION: Richard Wagner (1813-1883).) It was…
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Essays

by Irmin Vinson IN HIS ANALYSIS of Nikolaus Lehnhoff’s production of Der Fliegende Holländer (The Flying Dutchman) Michael Polignano mentions that “desecrating Wagner … is something of an industry in post-World War II Germany.” The recent Stuttgart version of Wagner’s…
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Classic Essays

by Sir Oswald Mosley (pictured) EDITOR’S NOTE: This piece is the first in a series of articles which will illustrate some of the earlier intimations, in the works of other writers and thinkers, of the central ideas of Dr. William Pierce’s philosophy, Cosmotheism. Even the reader who is not…
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Classic Essays

RICHARD WAGNER (pictured) was one of those rare composers who was as skillful in his theoretical writings as in his music (another was the Frenchman Jean-Phillipe Rameau). Wagner did not rely on his music alone to gain a reputation, but attempted to construct a coherent theory on which to base his compositions.…
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News

THE Rhinemaiden descended by a cable to the floor of the Metropolitan Opera stage. She extended her body just in front of a hollow beneath part of the set for Wagner’s “Rheingold.” Slowly, inexorably, the edge of a 45-ton structure tilted down toward her. “Get her underneath,” a stagehand…
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Classic Essays

by Sir Oswald Mosley (pictured) EDITOR’S NOTE: This piece is the first in a series of articles which will illustrate some of the earlier intimations, in the works of other writers and thinkers, of the central ideas of Dr. William Pierce’s philosophy, Cosmotheism. Even the reader who is not…
Read More