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Literature

Classic EssaysRevilo P. Oliver

Daniel Bel’s sculpture Beowulf by Revilo P. Oliver IN ONE OF THESE Postscripts, published in May 1986, I described briefly one ominous symptom of the growing epidemic of unreason among scholars, an attempt to Christianize the oldest monument of English literature by atrocious mutilation…
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Essays

by Karl Radl BRAM Stoker’s 1897 novel Dracula is extremely well-known and was the catalyst for the popularization and mass marketing of the myths and legends associated with vampirism. (1) It is commonly believed that Stoker took his inspiration for his Count Dracula from Romania and more particularly…
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Classic EssaysRevilo P. Oliver

Best-selling novelist Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985; born Janet Miriam Holland Taylor Caldwell) was a prominent member of the John Birch Society in the 1960s, as was Dr. Oliver, and the two were acquainted. In 1931 she married her then-boss, Marcus Reback (an “immigrant from Russia”),…
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Fiction

by Lord Dunsany THROUGH THE streets of Coventry one winter’s night strode a triumphant spirit. Behind him stooping, unkempt, utterly ragged, wearing the clothes and look that outcasts have, whining, weeping, reproaching, an ill-used spirit tried to keep pace with him. Continually she plucked…
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Essays

Bram Stoker by Karl Radl ABRAHAM STOKER, better known as Bram Stoker, is one of most famous Anglophone novelists in history. He is best known for being the author of the quintessential Gothic novel: Dracula. The interesting thing about Stoker is that while many people admire him as the populariser of…
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Fiction

by Lord Dunsany I WAS CLIMBING round the perilous outside of the Palace of Colquonhombros. So far below me that in the tranquil twilight and clear air of those lands I could only barely see them lay the craggy tops of the mountains. It was along no battlements or terrace edge I was climbing, but on the sheer…
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Douglas MercerEssays

by Douglas Mercer F. SCOTT Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby holds the honorable distinction of being the only book published prior to 1945 that contains the words “swastika” and “holocaust.” But that’s the least of it. Was F. Scott Fitzgerald a “racist”? Cover of the first edition…
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Fiction

by Lord Dunsany DEATH WAS sick. But they brought him bread that the modern bakers make, whitened with alum, and the tinned meats of Chicago, with a pinch of our modern substitute for salt. They carried him into the dining-room of a great hotel (in that close atmosphere Death breathed more freely), and…
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Fiction

by Lord Dunsany IN TIME as well as space my fancy roams far from here. It led me once to the edge of certain cliffs that were low and red and rose up out of a desert: a little way off in the desert there was a city. It was evening, and I sat and watched the city. Presently I saw men by threes and fours come softly stealing…
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Fiction

by Lord Dunsany WHEN THAT happened which had been so long in happening and the world hit a black, uncharted star, certain tremendous creatures out of some other world came peering among the cinders to see if there were anything there that it were worth while to remember. They spoke of the great things that…
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