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Literature

Fiction

by Lord Dunsany THE POET came unto a great country in which there were no songs. And he lamented gently for the nation that had not any little foolish songs to sing to itself at evening. And at last he said: “I will make for them myself some little foolish songs so that they may be merry in the lanes and…
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Fiction

by Lord Dunsany I SAW an unclean-feeder by the banks of the river of Time. He crouched by orchards numerous with apples in a happy land of flowers; colossal barns stood near which the ancients had stored with grain, and the sun was golden on serene far hills behind the level lands. But his back was to all these…
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Fiction

by Lord Dunsany WHEN travellers from London entered Arcady they lamented one to
another the death of Pan. And anon they saw him lying stiff and still. Horned Pan was still and the dew was on his fur; he had not the look
of a live animal. And then they said, “It is true that Pan is dead.” And, standing…
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Essays

Christianity is the greatest regression humanity has ever experienced: The Jew has thrown back humanity one and a half thousand years — Hitler’s Table Talk THE PRESENT BOOK is an abridged translation of some chapters of the first three volumes of Karlheinz Deschner’s ten-volume Kriminalgeschichte
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Fiction

by Lord Dunsany WHEN ONE HAS seen Spring’s blossom fall in London, and Summer appear and ripen and decay, as it does early in cities, and one is in London still, then, at some moment or another, the country places lift their flowery heads and call to one with an urgent, masterful clearness, upland…
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Fiction

by Lord Dunsany ALL WE WHO WRITE put me in mind of sailors hastily making rafts upon doomed ships. When we break up under the heavy years and go down into eternity with all that is ours our thoughts like small lost rafts float on awhile upon Oblivion’s sea. They will not carry much over those tides,…
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Fiction

by Lord Dunsany CHARON leaned forward and rowed. All things were one with his weariness. It was not with him a matter of years or of centuries, but of wide floods of time, and an old heaviness and a pain in the arms that had become for him part of the scheme that the gods had made and was of a piece with Eternity.…
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EssaysVideo

A Bushwackk/Heretic production based on an oration by Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BCE) (Taylor Caldwell’s paraphrase of Cicero’s Second Catiline Oration in her Pillar of Iron) A NATION can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy…
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Fiction

by Lord Dunsany GOING DOWN Picadilly one day and nearing Grosvenor Place I saw, if my memory is not at fault, some workmen with their coats off — or so they seemed. They had pickaxes in their hands and wore corduroy trousers and that little leather band below the knee that goes by the astonishing name of “York-to-London.”…
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Fiction

by Lord Dunsany ONE’S SPIRIT goes further in dreams than it does by day. Wandering once by night from a factory city I came to the edge of Hell. The place was foul with cinders and cast-off things, and jagged, half-buried things with shapeless edges, and there was a huge angel with a hammer building…
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