David SimsEssays

Preparing for a Food Shortage

by David Sims

AMERICA HAS been, since the Great Depression of the 1930s, very adroit in avoiding food shortages. Several predictions of famine have come and gone, and a famine has never happened. That’s good. But, nevertheless, it is possible. One of the wisest of folk sayings is “Better safe than sorry.”

If a severe food crisis happens, then it will probably happen quickly.

Do you remember how all the toilet paper disappeared from the store shelves for a while during the summer of 2020? People who regarded toilet paper as a necessity that they wanted to be sure that they would not have to do without panicked and bought all the toilet paper that they could find. The stores ran out, and only the first people to hit the stores got what they wanted.

That can happen with food, too.

The replenishment cycle with food is longer than it is with toilet paper. Whereas toilet paper can be produced as fast as trees can be cut down and loaded into factory machinery, food must be grown, and that can take time.

If the farmers don’t have fertilizer, then they’ll have a bad year in which they can’t grow as much as people need. And that can happen for many years in a row, while imports aren’t arriving and America hasn’t yet found a viable work-around. On that topic, Kashmir’s Ziraat Times recently reported:

Crops are the basis of our food system, whether feeding us or animals, and without secured supply in terms of volume and quality, our food system is bankrupt. Crops rely on a good supply of nutrients to deliver high yields and quality (as well as water, sunlight and a healthy soil), which in modern farming systems come from manufactured fertilizers. As you sit and read this article, the air you breath contains 78% nitrogen gas – this is the same source of nitrogen used in the production of most manufactured nitrogen fertilizers.

However, to take this gas from the air and into a bag of fertilizer takes a huge amount of energy. The Haber-Bosch process, which converts nitrogen and hydrogen into ammonia as a crucial step in creating fertilizers, uses between 1% and 2% of all energy generated globally by some estimates. Consequently, the cost of producing nitrogen fertilizer is directly linked to the cost of fuel….Russia and Ukraine are also major producers and suppliers of fertilizers and their raw materials. For example, Norwegian group Yara, the biggest producer and supplier of fertilizers in Europe, makes much of its product in Ukraine. Reducing western trade with Russia, and the disrupted supply lines in Ukraine, will therefore add another layer of pressure to the production and supply of fertilizers.

Russia is responsible for nearly a tenth of global nitrogen fertilizer production. Russia also has a comparable share of phosphate fertilizers and together with Belarus around a third of potash production….

Vladimir Putin has explicitly been connecting the disruption to the trade in fertilizers with a coming surge in food prices.

The Russians have just announced a suspension in fertilizer exports to the west. With major markets in Brazil, China and the US for Russian ferilisers, these global suppliers of grains to the world will be impacted.

Ukraine is also a huge agricultural producer in its own right, supplying significant quantities of cereals and oil crops to global markets (12% of the world’s wheat and the world’s largest supplier of sunflower oil). So at a time when many crops in Ukraine are due to be sown or those already in the ground are expecting fertilizers and pesticides, disruptions will put further pressure on this year’s harvest and lead to higher food prices. At particular risk from reductions in Ukrainian and Russian grain supplies are Egypt, Turkey and Bangladesh.

In order to bridge the gap in time, between the onset of a food shortage and its end, you need to have several years’ worth of non-perishable food supply. Dry rice, dry beans, and such, in significant quantity and in containers that will preserve them from the decay and rot that moisture or oxygen would eventually cause.

Your neighbors, friends that they might be, won’t be able to help you. Or, anyway, not nearly as much as you would need to be helped if you haven’t prepared at all. Each family will do little more than provide for itself for however long they believe the shortage will last. Beg however you might, the head of that family will be weighing your life against the lives of his immediate kin, and you will come away the loser in that calculation.

So — last warning. Get fully prepped, and not merely token prepped. Don’t be satisfied with a store of food that gives you something to point at. When it’s gone, you won’t be eating anymore.

Most people don’t do enough prepping when it comes to food. Those living in Kharkov, Ukraine, found out the hard way that a single five-gallon bucket of rice or lentils for a family does not constitute being prepared for a food shortage. You should be able to get through an entire year, at least, without ever leaving your home.

A five-gallon bucket of rice and another five-gallon bucket of dry lentils will last how long? Only 80 days for one adult person. So a two years’ supply would require nine buckets of rice and another nine buckets of dry lentils. Per person.

Don’t worry. You’ll eat it. And if you shop before the shortage begins, you’ll save a lot of money. Although it might not seem like it when you spend the money on bulk dried foods, you actually would have spent a lot more in the grocery store over time.

The difficult expense is the buckets. You do need to have these in order to seal the food in, away from oxygen and moisture. And the prices of five-gallon buckets have already gone up. It used to be $13 for one bucket with a lid. Now it’s over $20 per bucket.

Still, if you buy buckets with “gamma” lids, you can reuse the bucket over and over, assuming that you can get more food to put in it.

* * *

Source: Author and Ziratt Times

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Elfriede
Elfriede
25 March, 2022 3:01 am

I would like at least currant and gooseberry bushes (Ribes genus), Juneberries (Amelanchier genus, also known as the serviceberries or saskatoons), creeping grapes (Mahonia repens) and other native edibles where I live.

ricck lineheart
ricck lineheart
Reply to  Elfriede
25 March, 2022 6:02 pm

I can remember my grandparents telling me when I was a boy , talking about the Great Depression in the U.S. . People in the cities were in Govt. soup lines while the city parks all across the country people were catching and eating pigeons . My grandparents I would say lived in a more rural area but were doing as others and eating Robins and Blackbirds . Most of the woods had been hunted out it was hard to even see a squirrel or rabbit , everything had been hunted down for food including opossums !…When hunger hits it it does not taste good.

Elfriede
Elfriede
Reply to  Elfriede
25 March, 2022 8:08 pm

Has anyone here ever heard about Plants For A Future?

Here’s an example entry on Mahonia repens in their database.

Joshua
Joshua
25 March, 2022 11:54 am

I think that the Jews could be planning a second Holodomor. This time, globally.

Iceberg
Iceberg
Reply to  Joshua
26 March, 2022 3:16 pm

Yes! Between 2015 and 2018, the Swedish government sent out two or three warnings to stock up on food, blankets, medication, batteries, water, etc. The third-world flood came during those years, but I believe something else was planned and delayed. When WuFlu became overhyped in the US and UK, I thought it might be that (Sweden had no WuFlu to speak of, no masks, no lockdowns, nothing). “They” are somehow involved. And I get the feeling this need for food stores is looming in the not-so-distant future.

Walt Hampton
Walt Hampton
Reply to  Joshua
7 April, 2022 1:02 pm

I agree. I certainly believe it would
be in their nature to do so.

cas
cas
26 March, 2022 3:36 am

Type Nebraska retiree grows lemons in winter into search engine. These type of greeenhouses as he has proven are relatively cheap.He uses shallow geothermal to heat in winter using corrugated pipes. If the world was smart these would be mass produced by now and lined up in every farm A freeze dryer can be had for under $4000; it’s about the size of a washing machine. Time to convert your land to permaculture. Acorns can be made into usable flour. Soak in low heat in water, do this a couple times then mill. The more your neighbors know to stock up the better for all of you. Also i qould suggest to learn how to cache your food buried. You may not like the amish, but truly they are probably… Read more »

Cheops
Cheops
27 March, 2022 4:17 pm

I can’t believe you people talk about this thing like it needs to be tolerated, that nothing can be done, so just get ready to grin and bear it, and if you die, oh well. WHAT THE EFFF IS WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE ?????????? When will we rise to action ? What’s it gonna take. The more we tolerate, the harder they push, AS YOU CAN SEE. I hope you’re all happy with yourselves as you get ready to spend every last penny you have on FOOD, something we never had to worry about, and shouldn’t have to worry about NOW. These Khazarian pricks are manufacturing this crisis and all of us sheep are just sitting back and getting ready to take it. God help our apathy ! We deserve… Read more »

cas
cas
Reply to  Cheops
3 April, 2022 5:10 am

Nobody is saying that here that “nothing can be done”. One of the only logical solutions imho is to merge race and “religion” cosmotheism which the NA is doing. It has to done to a point where no body politic can even question that race is NOT “religion” to enough white folk that it can be recognized by every other race on this planet. It is only by bringing back White world class discipline that the Germans and the British had.

H. Bergeron
H. Bergeron
Reply to  Cheops
6 April, 2022 5:29 pm

Take note of the rules of this website. You’re not even allowed to say the words that will lead to the actions you desire. No one will act, ever. And no one will even talk about it, ever. Because it’s against the rules. And whites don’t break the rules. We might get called bad names. It’s that simple.

Feelings hurt by that? Oh well. Too bad. It’s not like we were going to act, anyway.

Jim - National Alliance Staff
Jim - National Alliance Staff
Reply to  Cheops
11 April, 2022 12:43 pm

Another nutter has arrived, screaming for “action” like the prototypical FBI asset.

Antanas
Antanas
27 March, 2022 5:41 pm

This article is very important actually. And when planning food storage for a long time (longer than 1-2 months), quite a small amount of people are able to actually plan real quantities needed to store, and grasp what exactly is needed to be done in order to plan for such quantities. Moreover, another very important aspect of food is to store not just “dry lentils”, but also other types of food which contain fat, carbohydrates, and so on. Then, we need to calculate exact calory intakes a person needs in order to effectively store needed amounts of food. The following formulas can be used to calculate intakes of calories needed for ourselves and our family members: https://www.k-state.edu/paccats/Contents/Nutrition/PDF/Needs.pdf , and https://www.calculator.net/calorie-calculator.html . These numbers would come for reference purposes, values would… Read more »

James Clayton
James Clayton
31 March, 2022 10:25 pm

Well, not to advocate the violent overthrow of the government, which isn’t the ostensible purpose of this thread or these pages: let’s talk storage containers for a moment. If you want plastics relatively safe in contact with dried bean and rice, flour, etc., consider keeping the food in either the bags they were shipped-in or using liners. We use standard buckets from HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS (currently $5 for the bucket and $2.50 for the lid). LOWES will take any competitor’s bucket, in any condition, and replace it with their own. During the supply chain disruption at Los Angeles and Long Beach, one couldn’t find “Homer” buckets and/or lids for a season. HARBOR FREIGHT buckets are labeled Made in the U.S.A. but then, for all practical purposes, China owns the U.S.A.… Read more »

James Clayton
James Clayton
Reply to  James Clayton
14 April, 2022 10:06 am

Purchased LEAKTITE Made in USA food grade five-gallon buckets with lids for less than ten dollars yesterday each at LOWES. 0 8430539241 1 About $2 online: “Warner-brand Plastic Bucket & Pail Openers, #556”. A Sheriff’s runner was purchasing among other things, similar bucket tools at LOWES. We don’t like LOWES for several reasons, by the way. We’ve bought such containers for less in the past from a Utah supplier with local retail outlets that also sells grain. The main purpose of buckets, as far as we’re concerned, is to keep moisture and rodents out long-term. So, we use the inexpensive lids and both a bucket tool and a rubber mallet. Weevils can be kept from hatching and multiplying in those buckets with food-grade diatomaceous earth: suppliers and instructions can be… Read more »

Anonymoose
Anonymoose
10 April, 2022 11:41 pm

Rice and dry lentils can last a long time in an air-tight container, but they don’t make up a balanced diet, especially for children. Daily opening and closing buckets may introduce fungi and mold, since such foods lack the detested preservatives that might be a good thing during a SHTF situ. So a professional emergency food supplier may be safer, such as https://mypatriotsupply.com/collections/long-term-food-storage (MPS). However, storage for a large family is expensive (a 6 mo. MPS supply costs $1,587 per adult); fresh water is an extra. Extra, sealed bottles of multivitamins should be kept in the freezer, regardless. You can make your own individually vacuum-sealed, dehydrated meals; see https://www.amazon.com/dp/B008H2OELY and https://www.kohls.com/product/prd-4525096/nesco-deluxe-vacuum-sealer.jsp .Food stored this way may have a competitive shelf life with what MPS claims for its products; see https://survivewild.com/how-long-does-dehydrated-food-last/… Read more »

Anonymoose
Anonymoose
Reply to  Anonymoose
11 April, 2022 12:48 pm

Let me add that the 2 machines I referenced, the Presto Dehydro sold by Amazon, and the Nesco Deluxe vac sealer sold by Kohls and Amazon also, both have negative review comments that should be read before buying these products.

Susan
Susan
Reply to  Anonymoose
11 April, 2022 2:09 pm

I am a big fan of the vacuum sealers. I always buy meat and chicken on sale, hurry home and seal, then immediately freeze them. They stay fresh-tasting so much longer than in any other packaging. I date everything and use on a FIFO basis. There are clearance tables in grocery stores that sometimes mark down items up to 75% that can last a long time. I often see things that make life more pleasant, like dark chocolate and dried fruit. They’re often close to their sell-by dates but vacuum-sealed they last a lot longer. These save money and help create a good store of comforting and nutritional food in good times or bad. In times of starvation, high calorie foods are good! When the Covid circus started, we avoided… Read more »