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Jews: Taming the Chinese Under the Guise of “Scholarship”

A small part of the Nanjing University campus

As China rises, and awareness of Jewish power grows there, Jews are funding efforts to “tame” and control a significant part of the Chinese elite.

“DO THE Jews Really Control America?” asked one Chinese newsweekly headline in 2009. The factoids doled out in such articles and in books about Jews in China — for example: “The world’s wealth is in Americans’ pockets; Americans are in Jews’ pockets” — would seem to answer the question. In China, where Jews are widely perceived as “clever” and “accomplished,” they are meant as compliments. Scan the shelves in any bookstore in China and you are likely to find best-selling self-help books based on Jewish knowledge. Most focus on how to make cash. Titles range from 101 Money Earning Secrets From Jews’ Notebooks to Learn To Make Money With the Jews.

The Chinese recognize, and embrace, common characteristics between their culture and Jewish culture. Both races have a large diaspora spread across the globe. Both place emphasis on family, tradition, and education. Both boast civilizations that date back thousands of years (though calling the Jews’ astoundingly accomplished parasitism a “civilization” is quite a stretch). In Shanghai, visiting Jews are often told with nods of approval that they “must be” intelligent, savvy, and quick-witted. 

Prof. Xu Xin, director of the Diane and Guilford Glazer Institute of Jewish and Israel Studies at Nanjing University states that many Chinese believe the Jews to be “smart, rich, and very cunning.” Chinese tycoon Chen Guangbiao made international headlines by publicly announcing his ambitions to buy the New York Times and later the Wall Street Journal. In a TV interview he explained that he would be an ideal newspaper magnate because “I am very good at working with Jews” — who, he said, controlled the media.

Today there are more than half a dozen “study the Jews” programs across the country, many started by Xu’s former students. In Nanjing, Judaica courses — from Ancient Jewish History to Rabbinic Literature to Holocaust Studies — have proved popular. According to Xu one of the best-attended courses in the institute is Jewish Culture and World Civilization, in which 18 topics are covered in a 20-week semester. It attracts roughly 200 undergraduate students per term. Survey of Judaism and Study of Monotheism, both graduate courses, have enrollments of around 30 to 40. Bookshelves boast Chinese translations of the Haggadah and Xu’s own books, including his best-selling A History of Jewish Culture.

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The Jewish power structure wants to control and channel this burgeoning awareness of Jews in China. The Institute is funded largely by foreign Jewish donors, who have their own interest in seeing portrayals of Judaism propagated in “a more balanced way.” “Hatred and intolerance are bred in ignorance,” the executive director of the China Judaic Studies Association, Beverly Friend, a patron of the institute, wrote in an email. “The institute provides knowledge.”

Xu was first introduced to Beverly Friend and her husband Jim in the mid-1980s, when the latter was teaching English at Nanjing University; Jim was the first Jew Xu had ever met. In 1986 Xu traveled to America for the first time, where he stayed with the Friends in Chicago. The trip was revelatory: Not only did he learn how to use a fork but he started attending Shabbat dinners and other Jewish celebrations. It convinced him that China might be able to learn something from the West — and in particular, from Jews.

This conviction was rooted in his own country’s recent resurfacing from a traumatic past. Like many teenagers at the time, Xu was a Red Guard during the Cultural Revolution, one of the zealous youths who helped destroy much of China’s own heritage. “I participated in the Cultural Revolution. We all went through the Great Leap Forward,” Xu said, referring to Mao’s push for industrialization that helped lead to a famine in which more than 30 million perished. “We started to feel from the bottom heart there is something wrong with society. China needed new ideas.”

As China began to open up again to the West, Xu read Western literature, which had been banned under Mao. He’d soon realized that his favorite writers — J.D. Salinger, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth — were Jewish (today, many of their works are translated into Chinese and studied by college and graduate students in China).

One wonders if this tilt toward Jewish authors is also pushed and funded by Jews. One also wonders if Xu is telling the truth about the sequence of events and the “spontaneous” sparking of his interest. As psychology became popular, Xu delved into Freud; he also held immense respect for Henry Kissinger, who orchestrated the start of American relations with China. Like Salinger, Bellow, Freud, and the godfather of Communism Karl Marx, Kissinger was a Jew. “He was a refugee and an immigrant to the U.S., but within 20 years he had made his way to become secretary of State. How come?” Xu wondered.

The search for an answer to that question became Xu’s mission, he now claims. He returned from two years in the United States, and a formative official trip to Israel in 1988, convinced that Judaism could provide lessons for a young and hungry new China. “Once we learned, we wanted to teach,” he said. Xu set up university classes, attended international seminars, and translated the Encyclopedia Judaica into Chinese. Eventually, once diplomatic relations between Israel and China were established in 1992, he founded the Institute of Jewish Studies.

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If Xu had the sense of discovering something new, the Jews were not exactly strangers to China. Jews likely first arrived in China via the Silk Road almost 1,000 years ago. In the mid-19th century, following the Opium Wars, Iraqi Jews settled alongside British traders in Shanghai, where many made their fortunes.

Chinese state media has long championed positive portrayals of the Jews, in part because Judaism, with its ethnically based and non-evangelical nature, has proved less of a threat to the Communist Party than other foreign monotheistic religions, like Christianity or Islam. (China’s own Jewish population, the Kaifeng Jews, being almost completely assimilated.) High-profile Jewish figures in the Chinese Communist Party’s own history include Sidney Rittenberg, the first American citizen to join the party, and the journalist Israel Epstein, whose funeral was attended by former Chinese President Hu Jintao and former Premier Wen Jiabao.

China’s relationship to the Jewish state is more complicated. In 1990, Xu was invited to participate in a closed meeting of Chinese intellectuals, military personnel, and party officials, which posed the question: Should China initiate formal diplomatic relations with Israel? The answer was no — but times have changed. Today China’s authoritarian government is invested heavily in the oil states, including Iran and Iraq. But it is also increasingly forming ties with Israel. In 2013, Benjamin Netanyahu traveled to China, the first official visit by an Israeli prime minister in six years. Many believe the trip signals growing Chinese interest in Israeli technologies, as China attempts to transform itself from a manufacturing to an innovation-and-knowledge-based economy.

“China is learning more technology from Israel, trading more,” said Xu, who was in the process of creating a specific course on Israel to reflect this change. “China finally decided to establish formal diplomatic relations with Israel [in 1992] because they believed that being friendly with Jews is good for China’s development and to change China’s image internationally.” If China’s global clout does not yet match its status as one of the world’s fastest-growing economies, developing closer ties with Israel and the Jewish Diaspora may be a relatively easy way to widen China’s influence, or so some Chinese leaders seem to believe.

Support of Israel also underpins Jewish patronage of the institute. “Bringing China and the Jewish people and specifically the Jewish state, Israel, closer together has merit,” said John Fishel, a Jew and a consultant for the Glazer Foundation. “There are increasing exchanges between Israel and China on a number of levels including academic, cultural, and economic. The growth of both Jewish Studies and Israel Studies in Chinese universities seems to be creating opportunities for the knowledge base to grow.”

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Yet on a human level, at least, the geopolitical rationale for greater Chinese-Jewish understanding may pale next to the role that the Jews play in China’s own search to rediscover itself. When Liu Nanyang first studied history of the Middle East at Nanjing University he became interested in how Israel had managed to survive. “There were many Middle East wars, but Israel was still there,” he said. “So, I wanted to know why.”

“Do you know how many Chinese Nobel Prize winners there are?” asked Liu, not waiting for an answer. He didn’t have to. The Chinese have long articulated ambitions to win more Nobel prizes. (No Chinese-born scientist, for example, has ever been awarded a Nobel Prize for work in the mainland.) “The Jewish population is very small but the Chinese is big,” Liu said. “Compare that, if you will. When we know that the Jewish people are so successful in both science and human studies, we feel that maybe we can learn from them.”

When Chen Guangbiao, a Chinese billionaire, recently averred he would be successful in buying and running American media properties because he is “good at working with Jews,” Liu said he was exasperated. “In their minds, Jewish people control the banks in America. It means for them that Jewish people control the world, control the governments,” he railed, shaking his hands in disbelief. “I feel it’s a joke.” He provided no evidence to disprove such control, however.

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Source: Tablet magazine and National Vanguard correspondents

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Ed "Truck" Ross
Ed "Truck" Ross
10 December, 2020 7:52 pm

Oh great. Now China, right on track to become the #1 world superpower, is starting to cozy up to the yids and study their methods and machinations. This won’t end well for China or the world. The jews will suck everything out of that country they can. But at least the chinks aren’t white, and there’s a billion of them, so I don’t think they have to worry about their new friends subverting the demographics and culture. The yids only are biologically programmed to do that to white countries.

BuelahMan
BuelahMan
Reply to  Ed "Truck" Ross
11 December, 2020 8:34 am

Look up the guy named Zuckerberg (with his wife and child) to see how they manage to subvert the Chinese demographics.

Tonatiuh Haruki
Tonatiuh Haruki
Reply to  Ed "Truck" Ross
18 December, 2020 1:30 am

Talking about China, dont miss the fact that the elite are already working in immitating what they have done there, with the help of the private and public sectors in their controll (China is more like neliberal-communism rather than just communist), here in America. You may ask Microsoft, ONU,G20, Rockefeller Foundation, DIF, Gavi, Soros agents like Stanley Druckenmiller, Peter Thiel cofounder of Paypal and invited member of Bilderberg last time and the ID2020 what i am talking about. https://www.bitchute.com/video/kM9jzp0EAv8W/ https://www.bitchute.com/video/BbHyylXMROJy/ mm, that kind of recminds me of the Social Credit System of China in a way, or ell very close at least. I also recommned to learn how to use Youtube-dl if interested in doing a Bulk Download of videos and images of Sites since work for Youtube, Bitchute and… Read more »

Prinz Edelhart
Prinz Edelhart
10 December, 2020 8:32 pm

There is such a thing as an Asian mindset and both Mongols (including Chinese) and Semites (including Jews) are Asian peoples.

Matthew
Matthew
11 December, 2020 4:32 am

A bestselling book entitled “A History of Jewish Culture”?

That is an oxymoron.

Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost
11 December, 2020 10:51 am

The Chinese know how to play the game. The dragon can appear to be tame, until he gets what he wants.

In the West, we have succumbed to “practicality.” We do not value our artists and creatives, those who can think “out of the box.” We shuffle about flat-footed, while the Chinese dance around us.

Christianity did away with the creativity of the Greeks (and some Romans) and money-making did away with the creativity of the Renaissance.

The West needs a new wellspring of creativity.

Walt Hampton
Walt Hampton
Reply to  Arvin N. Prebost
11 December, 2020 9:40 pm

The Jews can’t pull off over there what they
have done over here. Don’t think so? Then
count the number of Chinese “holocaust
museums” over there. It looks like the laugh
is on the gullible White man.

Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost
Reply to  Walt Hampton
12 December, 2020 11:10 am

I counted three, according to Wikipedia. I would prefer to go to a “Hitler Fried Chicken” restaurant in Thailand, anyway.

Elfriede
Elfriede
Reply to  Arvin N. Prebost
12 December, 2020 12:25 am

We shuffle about flat-footed, while the Chinese dance around us.

The West needs a new wellspring of creativity.

Dancing to celebrate our racial sclerosis?

Anyway, whether or not there are any Chinese subtitles for the 2009 black comedy film A Serious Man (which is, from what I’ve read, supposed to show the bankruptcy and fraud of Judaism), at least there’s the Society of Classical Poets and one idea of where to start on creating the wellspring of creativity: WildHunterWorld.

Last edited 1 month ago by Elfriede
Arvin N. Prebost
Arvin N. Prebost
Reply to  Elfriede
12 December, 2020 11:04 am

I liked the Classical Poets, but the WildHunter Deviant Art thing went over my head.

Elfriede
Elfriede
Reply to  Arvin N. Prebost
13 December, 2020 7:37 am

That’s one reason why the DeviantArt group’s section of favorite artwork will have examples for anyone, who wants to make a contribution or two, but isn’t sure where to start.

Last edited 1 month ago by Elfriede