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Aryan Invasion of India: Myth or Reality?

by Tom Rowsell

DNA evidence has shed new light on the origins of the Indian people, the Hindu religion, and the Sanskrit language. Pastoralists of the Andronovo culture from the Bronze age steppe invaded India from the northwest and brought Indo-European languages to the Indian subcontinent. These pastoralists were ethnically White people, and they mixed with [the aboriginal] Indians to create the modern genetic diversity of India. This theory has been developed over 200 years, and has often been attacked as a colonial fable or even as “Nazi propaganda,” but now genetic science has vindicated the Victorian scholars who said the roots of the Aryans lay in the Corded Ware culture of Europe.

Saying that these people were central Asians because they entered India from central Asia is like saying British people were fish because they entered India from the sea.

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Source: Survive the Jive

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2 Comments

  1. Marc
    1 May, 2019 at 5:55 am — Reply

    The famous Racial Scientist Hans F. K. GÜNTHER has written an entire book on this very interesting subject: “Die Nordische Rasse bei den Indo-germanen Asiens”. I do not know if it has been translated in english, but I believe the original german book can be easily found and downloaded on the Internet. A few books by GÜNTHER can be downloaded for free on the web site: archive.org.

    • Marc
      1 May, 2019 at 6:03 am — Reply

      I believe, however, that it is quite possible that White populations may have existed in India and South-East Asia since time immemorial… The same could certainly be said about all of the ancient Americas!

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