David SimsNews

CBS Ousts Moonves After Sex Abuse Allegations

Chen and Moonves

Introduction by David Sims

LES MOONVES, a Jewish television executive, has been fired from his cushy job at CBS after several women accused him of sexual abuse. Not having had to work his way up, Moonves joined CBS in July 1995 as President of CBS Entertainment. Inexplicably, he became chairman of CBS in February 2016. One of his more famous quotes is “It may not be good for America, but it’s damn good for CBS.” He has one child by his (current) wife, Julie Chen, who is, at least for now, standing by her man. He is, after all, just shy of being a billionaire.

Altogether, twelve women have accused Moonves of sexual misconduct. In statements eerily reminiscent of former New York Attorney General (and Jew) Eric Schneiderman, who also saw his career ended after women came forward with sex abuse accusations, Les Moonves has a record of publicly condemning sexual harassment in the workplace… and then, apparently, going on to commit such behavior once he was out of the spotlight. See the excerpt from the New Yorker below.

(Another prominent Jew whose reputation received a downward correction by women with sexual abuse allegations is Harvey Weinstein, whose mug is literally the poster face of every anti-Semite’s favorite Jew: fat, ugly, and unkempt, with greed, narcissism and gross over-indulgence written all over it.) [In the recent tsunami of sexual abuse revelations about powerful media and money men, one thing that is seldom mentioned is what a huge percentage of the abusers are Jews, and another — that even the most daring investigative journalists are afraid to mention — is the fact that these Jews are primarily abusing White women. — Ed.]

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FOR MORE than twenty years, Leslie Moonves has been one of the most powerful media executives in America. As the chairman and C.E.O. of CBS Corporation, he oversees shows ranging from “60 Minutes” to “The Big Bang Theory.” His portfolio includes the premium cable channel Showtime, the publishing house Simon & Schuster, and a streaming service, CBS All Access. Moonves, who is sixty-eight, has a reputation for canny hiring and project selection. The Wall Street Journal recently called him a “TV programming wizard”; the Hollywood Reporter dubbed him a “Wall Street Hero.” In the tumultuous field of network television, he has enjoyed rare longevity as a leader. Last year, according to filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, he earned nearly seventy million dollars, making him one of the highest-paid corporate executives in the world.

In recent months, Moonves has become a prominent voice in Hollywood’s #MeToo movement. In December, he helped found the Commission on Eliminating Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace, which is chaired by Anita Hill. “It’s a watershed moment,” Moonves said at a conference in November. “I think it’s important that a company’s culture will not allow for this. And that’s the thing that’s far-reaching. There’s a lot we’re learning. There’s a lot we didn’t know.”

But Moonves’s private actions belie his public statements. Six women who had professional dealings with him told me that, between the nineteen-eighties and the late aughts, Moonves sexually harassed them. Four described forcible touching or kissing during business meetings, in what they said appeared to be a practiced routine. Two told me that Moonves physically intimidated them or threatened to derail their careers. All said that he became cold or hostile after they rejected his advances, and that they believed their careers suffered as a result. “What happened to me was a sexual assault, and then I was fired for not participating,” the actress and writer Illeana Douglas told me. All the women said they still feared that speaking out would lead to retaliation from Moonves, who is known in the industry for his ability to make or break careers. “He has gotten away with it for decades,” the writer Janet Jones, who alleges that she had to shove Moonves off her after he forcibly kissed her at a work meeting, told me. “And it’s just not O.K.”

Thirty current and former employees of CBS told me that such behavior extended from Moonves to important parts of the corporation, including CBS News and “60 Minutes,” one of the network’s most esteemed programs. During Moonves’s tenure, men at CBS News who were accused of sexual misconduct were promoted, even as the company paid settlements to women with complaints. It isn’t clear whether Moonves himself knew of the allegations, but he has a reputation for being closely involved in management decisions across the network. Some of the allegations, such as those against the former anchor Charlie Rose, as reported by the Washington Post, have already become public. Other claims are being reported here for the first time. Nineteen current and former employees told me that Jeff Fager, the former chairman of CBS News and the current executive producer of “60 Minutes,” allowed harassment in the division. “It’s top down, this culture of older men who have all this power and you are nothing,” one veteran producer told me. “The company is shielding lots of bad behavior.”

In a statement, Moonves said, “Throughout my time at CBS, we have promoted a culture of respect and opportunity for all employees, and have consistently found success elevating women to top executive positions across our company. I recognize that there were times decades ago when I may have made some women uncomfortable by making advances. Those were mistakes, and I regret them immensely. But I always understood and respected—and abided by the principle—that ‘no’ means ‘no,’ and I have never misused my position to harm or hinder anyone’s career. This is a time when we all are appropriately focused on how we help improve our society, and we at CBS are committed to being part of the solution.” According to CBS, there have been no misconduct claims and no settlements against Moonves during his twenty-four years at the network. A statement from the company said, “CBS is very mindful of all workplace issues and takes each report of misconduct very seriously. We do not believe, however, that the picture of our company created in The New Yorker represents a larger organization that does its best to treat its tens of thousands of employees with dignity and respect. We are seeing vigorous discourse in our country about equality, inclusion, and safety in the workplace, and CBS is committed to being part of the solution to those important issues.”

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Source: Author and the New Yorker magazine

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2 Comments

  1. JM/Iowa
    September 15, 2018 at 12:56 am — Reply

    “But Moonves’s private actions belie his public statements. ”
    Imagine that! But really now, one standard for Jews and yet another for everyone else does seem to be their modus operandi.

  2. Arvin N. Prebost
    September 15, 2018 at 12:22 pm — Reply

    I must say that he does not have the look.

    And she looks like she could keep him in line with the dreaded karate move, “the eagle-claw groin grip.” I hope she does, and goes on to “the continuous and eternally powerful crocodile-jaw castration.”

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