NewsVideo

Real Cleansing Power

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9UykyiKczbw

AT FIRST WE thought this video — an actual television commercial from China — was going to be a promotion of racial mixing in that country. But it turned out to be pretty close to the opposite of that. The opening sequence verges on the disgusting, even for White viewers — souls with a love for Nature are repulsed by racial mixture, particularly with a such a primitive specimen. Clearly the Chinese, largely lacking the benefit of Jewish instruction and media control, have not been inculcated with a sense of reverence for — or the untouchability of — Congoids, nor any feelings of guilt for preferring their own race.

When this commercial aired on YouTube, one White woman with a Scandinavian surname commented “Hahahahahaha — I want that soap!” and a man from the UK remarked “I live in the East End of London and would like to order 1 million tons of that detergent. Thank you.”

The original poster stated in his introduction to the commercial:

“As any foreigner who has ever lived in China can attest, attitudes regarding race and skin color are often quite different here from back home. Still even with prior experience, sometimes this country can leave you completely and utterly dumbfounded.

“Such is the case with a recent incredibly racist advertisement for Qiaobi-brand laundry detergent that has been making the rounds on WeChat. According to one young lady on Weibo the ad appeared on television and before movies at Wanda Cinemas this month.

“In the video, a paint-splattered black man confidently approaches a young Chinese woman, only to have detergent placed in his mouth and his body shoved into a washing machine for a thorough rinsing. Once the wash cycle is done, out pops a pristine young Chinese man, as clean as can be.

“Wow! Those spots on the shirt came right off!

“It turns out that the video is actually a blatant ripoff (even using the exact same music and sound effects) of a series of Italian laundry detergent ads that were aired about 9 years ago. Containing similar racist overtones, the original ads argue that in fact ‘Coloured is better.’ The Chinese ad would seem to disagree.”

It would be interesting to know if the Italian ad series was created by a Jewish-dominated advertising agency. It would also be interesting to know if, in the Western world, there is any other kind.

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Source: National Vanguard correspondents

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4 Comments

  1. Joe
    4 June, 2016 at 7:14 pm — Reply

    Fantastic… utterly fantastic. I only wish we had the ability to air similar spoofs of truth in our Western lands. An illegal alien Mexican donning an “I hate Trump” shirt going after a gringa would have equally sufficed.

  2. Western Voices
    4 June, 2016 at 10:34 pm — Reply

    “Dangerously Racist”: Liberals outraged as Chinese Laundry Company switches Roles in 9 yo Commercial
    (Compare both videos one after another)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_mFO9YhDrk

  3. Anthony Collins
    5 June, 2016 at 3:37 am — Reply

    Talk about ethnic cleansing! Incidentally, Revilo P. Oliver remarked in America’s Decline: The Education of a Conservative that many Americans once sympathetically referred to Adolf Hitler as “The Dutch Cleanser”; “Old Dutch Cleanser” was a pumice-based scouring agent advertised with the primary slogan “Chases Dirt,” sometimes accompanied with the secondary slogan “Makes Everything Spick and Span” or “I’m Coming to Clean Up the Town!”

  4. Swedish Man
    16 June, 2016 at 4:19 pm — Reply

    Actually it is a rip off from a Swedish commercial from the 1910s or 1920s. Although they used an actor in black face, since back then we had a hard time finding a black man in this country. Today… well, I will second what the Eastender said. One million tons, please.

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