American Dissident VoicesKevin Alfred StromReports

Dresden: A Real Holocaust

dresden_angelby Kevin Alfred Strom (German translation here)

THE NIGHT OF February 13th, and February 14th, Valentine’s Day, mark an ominous anniversary in the history of Western Civilization. For beginning on the night of February 13th, 1945, occurred the destruction of Dresden.

On the eve of Valentine’s Day, 1945, World War II in Europe was nearly over. For all practical purposes Germany was already defeated. Italy, and Germany’s other European allies, had fallen by the wayside. The Red Army was rushing to occupy vast areas of what had been Germany in the East, while the allies of the Soviets, the British and Americans, were bombing what was left of Germany’s defenses and food and transportation infrastructure into nonexistence.

And what was Dresden? Most of you have probably heard of Dresden China, and that delicately executed and meticulously detailed porcelain is really a perfect symbol for that city. For centuries Dresden had been a center of art and culture, and refined leisure and recreation. She was a city of art museums and theatres, circuses and sports stadia, a town of ancient half-timbered buildings looking for all the world like those of medieval England, with venerable churches and centuries-old cathedrals gracing her skyline. She was a city of artists and craftsmen, of actors and dancers, of tourists and the merchants and hotels that served them. Above all, what Dresden was, was defined during the war by what she was not. She had no significant military or industrial installations. Because of this, Dresden had become, above all other things that she was, a city of children, of women, of refugees, and of the injured and maimed who were recovering from their wounds in her many hospitals.

These women and children, these wounded soldiers, these infirm and elderly people, these refugees fleeing from the brutal onslaught of the Communist armies to the East, had come to Dresden because it was commonly believed at the time that Dresden would not be attacked. Its lack of strategic or military or industrial significance, and the well-known presence of hundreds of thousands of innocent civilian refugees and even Allied prisoners of war, seemed to guarantee safety to the city. Surely, it was thought, not even the most powerful and determined enemy would be so depraved and sadistic, and so wasteful of that enemy’s own resources, to attack such a city. But the people of Dresden, who were happily attending the cinema or eating dinner at home or watching the show-horses in the circus on that fateful night were wrong, wrong, wrong. And their leaders were also wrong, for the city was virtually open and undefended and only minimal civil defense preparations had been made.

Dresden’s population had almost doubled in the months before the attack, mainly as a result of the influx of refugees from the Eastern Front, most of them women and young children. According to British historian David Irving, the briefings given to the British bomber squadrons before the attack on Dresden were curiously different. In one, the soldiers were told that their target was the railway center of Dresden. In another, they were told that the target was a poison-gas factory. In yet another, they were told that the target was a marshalling-grounds for troops in the city. Another was told that the target was a major arsenal. These were all lies.

The only marshalling-grounds for what few troops were in the area were located well outside the city. The arsenal had burned down in 1916. There were factories for toothpaste and baby-powder in Dresden, but none for poison gas. There were, in fact, no fewer than eighteen railway stations in Dresden, but only one was hit by the bombing, and that was barely touched and in fact was operating again just three days later.

According to copious documentation unearthed by David Irving from the archives of the American and British governments, the point of the attack was in fact to inflict the maximum loss of life on the civilian population and particularly to kill as many refugees as possible who were fleeing from the Red Army. In achieving these goals it was highly successful. It was thus planned and executed by those at the very highest levels of the British and American governments, who to attain their purposes even lied to their own soldiers and citizens, who to this day have never been told the full story by their leaders.

How was this devastating effect accomplished?

At 10:10 PM on February 13th, the first wave of the attack, consisting of the British Number 5 Bomber Group, began. The attacking force consisted of about 2,000 bombers with additional support craft, which dropped over 3,000 high explosive and 650,000 incendiary bombs (more commonly known as firebombs) on the center of the city. Incendiary bombs are not known for their efficiency per pound in destroying heavy equipment such as military hardware or railroad tracks, but are extremely effective in producing maximum loss of human life. The loads carried by the bombers were over 75 per cent incendiaries. In fact, the goal of the first wave of the attack was, according to British air commander Sir Arthur “Bomber” Harris, to set the city well on fire. That he did.

The lack of any effective anti-aircraft defenses allowed the bombers to drop to very low altitudes and thus a relatively high degree of precision and visual identification of targets was achieved. Despite the fact that they could clearly see that the marked target area contained hospitals and sports stadia and residential areas of center city Dresden, the bombers nevertheless obeyed orders and rained down a fiery death upon the unlucky inhabitants of that city on a scale which had never before been seen on planet Earth. Hundreds of thousands of innocents were literally consumed by fire, an actual holocaust by the true definition of the word: complete consumption by fire.

The incendiaries started thousands of fires and, aided by a stiff wind and the early-on destruction of the telephone exchanges that might have summoned firefighters from nearby towns, these fires soon coalesced into one unimaginably huge firestorm. Now such firestorms are not natural phenomena, and are seldom created by man, so few people have any idea of their nature. Basically, what happened was this: The intense heat caused by the huge column of smoke and flame, miles high and thousands of acres in area, created a terrific updraft of air in the center of the column. This created a very low pressure at the base of the column, and surrounding fresh air rushed inward at speeds estimated to be thirty times that of an ordinary tornado. An ordinary tornado wind-force is a result of temperature differences of perhaps 20 to 30 degrees centigrade. In this firestorm the temperature differences were on the order of 600 to 1,000 degrees centigrade. This inward-rushing air further fed the flames, creating a literal tornado of fire, with winds in the surrounding area of many hundreds of miles per hour–sweeping men, women, children, animals, vehicles and uprooted trees pell-mell into the glowing inferno.

But this was only the first stage of the plan.

Exactly on schedule, three hours after the first attack, a second massive armada of British bombers arrived, again loaded with high explosive and massive quantities of incendiary bombs. The residents of Dresden, their power systems destroyed by the first raid, had no warning of the second. Again the British bombers attacked the center city of Dresden, this time dividing their targets–one half of the bombs were to be dropped into the center of the conflagration, to keep it going, the other half around the edges of the firestorm. No pretense whatever was made of selecting military targets. The timing of the second armada was such as to ensure that a large quantity of the surviving civilians would have emerged from their shelters by that time, which was the case, and also in hopes that rescue and firefighting crews would have arrived from surrounding cities, which also proved to be true. The firefighters and medics thus incinerated hadn’t needed the telephone exchange to know that they were needed–the firestorm was visible from a distance of 200 miles.

It is reported that body parts, pieces of clothing, tree branches, huge quantities of ashes, and miscellaneous debris from the firestorm fell for days on the surrounding countryside as far away as eighteen miles. After the attack finally subsided, rescue workers found nothing but liquefied remains of the inhabitants of some shelters, where even the metal kitchen utensils had melted from the intense heat.

The next day, Ash Wednesday and Valentine’s Day, 1945, medical and other emergency personnel from all over central Germany had converged on Dresden. Little did they suspect that yet a third wave of bombers was on its way, this time American. This attack had been carefully coordinated with the previous raids. Four hundred fifty Flying Fortresses and a support contingent of fighters arrived to finish the job at noon. I quote from David Irving’s The Destruction of Dresden:

Just a few hours before Dresden had been a fairy-tale city of spires and cobbled streets . . . now total war had put an end to all that. . . . The ferocity of the US raid of 14th February had finally brought the people to their knees . . . but it was not the bombs which finally demoralised the people . . . it was the Mustang fighters, which suddenly appeared low over the city, firing on everything that moved . . . one section of the Mustangs concentrated on the river banks, where masses of bombed-out people had gathered. . . . British prisoners who had been released from their burning camps were among the first to suffer the discomfort of machine-gunning attacks . . . wherever columns of tramping people were marching in or out of the city they were pounced on by the fighters, and machine-gunned or raked with cannon fire.

Ladies and gentlemen, on this program I can only give you a bare glimpse of the inhuman horror of the holocaust of Dresden. In Dresden, no fewer than 135,000 innocent victims died, with some estimates as high as 300,000. More died in Dresden than died in the well-known attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. More destruction befell Dresden in one day than was inflicted on the whole of Britain during the entire war. And yet you haven’t been told.

I urge every one of you to read The Destruction of Dresden by David Irving. I assure you, after reading Irving’s book, you will never take seriously the Establishment’s version of what happened in that war again.

What you ought to take seriously, though, is the fact that the same clique that controlled the traitorous Roosevelt and Churchill governments, whose hatred of our race and civilization and whose alliance with Communism were the real causes of the holocaust of Dresden, still controls our government and our media today. It is they who are pushing for a disarmed, racially mixed America. It is they who promote the teaching of sodomy to our young children. It is they who are destroying our industrial infrastructure in the name of a global economy. It is they who created the drug subculture and then also the police state agencies which pretend to fight it. The hour is very late for America and indeed for all of Western civilization. But if patriots will heed our call, then there is no reason for despair. For the enemies of our nation may have power, but their power is based on lies. Won’t you help us cut through the chain of lies that holds our people in mental slavery?

Source: Free Speech, vol. 1, no. 3 (March 1995)

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3 Comments

  1. Kovács László
    February 13, 2015 at 4:31 am — Reply

    Szia!

  2. ff
    February 17, 2015 at 12:43 am — Reply

    All the whites murdered in WW2 should have been sent to the western hemisphere to propagate the white race. Hitler killed too many white people and his punishment was he and Germany were destroyed.

  3. February 12, 2018 at 12:22 pm — Reply

    KAS: THE NIGHT OF February 13th, and February 14th, Valentine’s Day, mark an ominous anniversary in the history of Western Civilization. For beginning on the night of February 13th, 1945, occurred the destruction of Dresden.

    Dresden. A Brief Background
    Monks gave Dresden its start by establishing a missionary settlement there in the 11th century. The city itself was originally founded around 1206 and became the capital of Heinrich the Illustrious, Margrave of Meissen, in 1270. After his death, Wenceslaus of Bohemia took possession, followed by the Margrave of Brandenburg.
    Early in the 14th century it was restored to the Margrave of Meissen. On the division of Saxony in 1485, it fell to the Albertine line. In the 18th century, its medieval beginnings gave way to Baroque masterpieces that made the city one of the outstanding urban centers of the Age of Enlightenment. Under Augustus I and Augustus II, Dresden was greatly expanded and enriched. Hoping to make Dresden the most important royal residence, they imported many of the best architects and painters from all over Europe. Their reign marked the beginning of Dresden’s emergence as a leading center of European culture for art and musical genius as well as technology. August the Strong

    Dresden was often called the “German Florence.” The rich architecture, art treasures, opera houses, museums, churches and royal palaces rivaled none. Overlooking green hills, one viewed the valley of the Elbe from Dresden to Meissen; The castle of Moritzburg, the hunting seat of the king of Saxony, perched on an island in a nearby lake. Dresden had long attracted poets, philosophers, writers and artists. In the 19th century, it was a center of German literature and musical Romanticism. Dresden developed into an important location for the international sale of art and antiques. Through the centuries, creative figures such as Goethe, Schiller, Wagner and Schumann flocked to Dresden.

    Dresden suffered repeated destruction: by fire in 1491, from the French under Napoleon, from bombardment by Prussia in 1760 and during the suppression of the constitutionalist May Uprising in 1849. For most of the 19th century and until 1918, the city was the capital of the Kingdom of Saxony. It had also become a major center of industry in the 19th century. The worst fate that befell the old city by far, however, was the intentional Allied bombing in February 1945 which pulverized it.

    From a description of Dresden in a 1911 Encyclopedia:

    The royal palace, or Georgenschloss, built in 1530-1535 by Duke George, was thoroughly restored, and in some measure rebuilt between 1890 and 1902, in German Renaissance style. The Georgentor has been widened, and through it, and beneath the royal apartments, vehicular traffic from the centre of the town is directed to the Augustusbrücke. The whole is surmounted by a lofty tower – 387 ft. – the highest in Dresden. The interior is splendidly decorated. In the palace chapel are pictures by Rembrandt, Nicolas Poussin, Guido Reni and Annibale Caracci. The adjoining Prinzen-Palais on the Taschenberg, built in 1715, has a chapel in which are various works of S. Torelli; it has also a library of 20,000 books.

    The Zwinger, begun in 1711, and built in the rococo style, forms an enclosure, within which is a statue of King Frederick Augustus I. It was intended to be the vestibule to a palace, but now contains a number of collections of great value. Until 1846 it was open at the north side; but this space has since been occupied by the museum, a beautiful Renaissance building, the exterior of which is adorned by statues of Michelangelo, Raphael, Giotto, Dante, Goethe and other artists and poets by Rietschel and Hahnel, and it contains the famous gallery.

    The Brühl palace, built in 1737 by Count Brühl, the minister of Augustus II, has been in some measure demolished to make room for the new Standehaus (diet house), with its main facade facing the Hofkirche; before the main entrance there is an equestrian statue (1906) of King Albert. Close by is the Briihl Terrace, approached by a fine flight of steps, on which are groups by Schilling, representing Morning, Evening, Day and Night. The terrace commands a view of the Elbe and the distant heights of Loschwitz and the Weisser Hirsch, but the prospect has of late years become somewhat marred, owing to the extension of the town up the river and to the two new bridges.

    The Japanese palace in the Neustadt, built in 1715 as a summer residence for Augustus II, receives its name from certain oriental figures with which it is decorated; it is sometimes called the Augusteum and contains the royal library. Among other buildings of note is the Hof theatre, a magnificent edifice in the Renaissance style, built after the designs of Semper, to replace the theatre burnt in 1869, and completed in 1878. A new town hall of huge dimensions, also in German Renaissance, with an octagon tower 400 ft. in height, stands on the former southern ramparts of the inner town.

    In the Altstadt the most striking of the newer edifices is the Kunstakademie, constructed from designs by Lipsius in the Italian Renaissance style, 1890-1894. The Albertinum, formerly the arsenal, built in 1559-1563, was rebuilt 1884-1889, and fitted up as a museum of oriental and classical antiquities, and as the depository of the state archives. On the right bank of the Elbe in Neustadt stand the fine buildings of the ministries of war, of finance, justice, the interior and education

    The chief pleasure-ground of Dresden is the Grosser Garten, in which there are a summer theatre, the Reitschel museum, and a chateau containing a museum of antiquities.

    The latter is composed chiefly of objects removed from the churches in consequence of the Reformation. Near the château is the zoological garden, formed in 1860, and excellently arranged. Dresden owes a large part of its fame to its extensive artistic, literary and scientific collections. Of these the most valuable is its splendid picture gallery, founded by Augustus I and increased by his successors at great cost. It is in the museum, and contains about 2500 pictures, being especially rich in specimens of the Italian, Dutch and Flemish schools.

    The gem of the collection is Raphael’s “Madonna di San Sisto,” for which a room is set apart. There is also a special room for the “Madonna” of the younger Holbein. Besides the picture gallery the museum includes a magnificent collection of engravings and drawings. There are upwards of 400,000 specimens, arranged in twelve classes, so as to mark the great epochs in the history of art. A collection of casts, likewise in the museum, is designed to display the progress of plastic art from the time of the Egyptians and Assyrians to modern ages.

    This collection was begun by Raphael Mengs, who secured casts of the most valuable antiques in Italy, some of which no longer exist. The Japanese palace contains a public library of more than 400,000 volumes, with about 3,000 MSS. and 20,000 maps. It is especially rich in the ancient classics, and in works bearing on literary history and the history of Germany, Poland and France. There are also a valuable cabinet of coins and a collection of ancient works of art. A collection of porcelain in the “Museum Johanneum” (which once contained the picture gallery) is made up of specimens of Chinese, Japanese, East Indian, Sevres and Meissen manufacture, carefully arranged in chronological order.

    In the Griine Gewolbe (Green Vault) of the Royal Palace, so called from the character of its original decorations, there is an unequalled collection of precious stones, pearls and works of art in gold, silver, amber and ivory. The objects, which are about 3,000 in number, are arranged in eight rooms. They include the regalia of Augustus II as king of Poland; the electoral sword of Saxony; a group by Dinglinger, in gold and enamel, representing the court of the grand mogul Aurungzebe, and consisting of 132 figures upon a plate of silver 4 ft. 4 in. square; the largest onyx known, 63 in. by 24 inches.; a pearl representing the dwarf of Charles II of Spain; and a green brilliant weighing 40 carats.

    The royal palace also has a gallery of arms consisting of more than 2,000 weapons of artistic or historical value. In the Zwinger are the zoological and mineralogical museums and a collection of instruments used in mathematical and physical science. Among other collections is that of the Korner museum with numerous reminiscences of the Goethe-Schiller epoch, and of the wars of liberation (1813-15), and containing valuable manuscripts and relics.

    Besides the two royal theatres, Dresden possesses several minor theatres and music halls. The pride of place in the world of music is held by the orchestra attached to the court theatre. Founded by Augustus II, it has become famous throughout the world, owing to the masters who have from time to time been associated with it – such as Pair, Weber, Reissiger and Wagner. Symphony and popular concerts are held throughout the year in various public halls, and, during the winter, concerts of church music are frequently given in the Protestant Kreuzand Frauen-Kirchen, and on Sundays in the Roman Catholic church.

    More, here: http://www.revisionist.net/dresden-hell-bg.html

    Visit more bombed German cities, here: http://www.revisionist.net/bombed-cities.html

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