Classic EssaysKevin Alfred Strom

The Question and the Quest

by Kevin Alfred Strom

WE MUST survive as a people. In ages past no one needed to explain that. We knew it in our hearts, in our souls. We knew we must survive. It was the unspoken assumption that made our work worthwhile, our cooperation necessary, and our patriotism vital and alive.

In today’s urbanized, globalized, money-oriented, multiracial society, though, we have lost touch with our souls, with our true inner spirit, with our instincts. We are more… rational. We demand answers and reasons for everything.

Western man stands at a point of crisis partly brought on by his own questing spirit and partly by the aliens and traitors who have purposely shaken our will to live. Today we ask ourselves, why should we survive?

And the answers given to that question are usually incomplete and unsatisfactory. Often they depend on an interpretation of ancient religious writings, the relevance and meaning of which are subject to endless debate and disagreement.

There must be an answer to that question which does not contradict our true religious feelings and which also does not contradict the observed facts of Nature.

“Why should we survive?” implies another, deeper, question: “Why are we here?” In a way, that question answers itself.

Why are we here? Why are we alive in this incomprehensibly vast universe, on this mote of dust that we call Earth that hangs suspended near the trailing edge of one among billions of galaxies which each contains a billion suns? What is it all about?

I said that, in a way, the question answers itself. It answers itself because we cannot answer it.

We simply don’t know enough to fully answer it yet. Many gaps remain in our knowledge of the evolution of matter and of life, for example.

We have achieved, through uncounted eons of upward development and struggle, the ability to understand ourselves and to understand the processes of life and of the universe to an almost infinitely greater degree than any other creature on this planet. Though the enemies of our race try mightily to suppress it, we have developed a moral — or some would say, a religious — sense that leads us onward, and upward; toward greater knowledge, toward truth, truth which gives us greater mastery of ourselves and of our surroundings and greater ability to understand Nature, and even to pose questions that would have been inconceivable only a few generations ago.

For all of our hard-won knowledge, however, the best men among us know all too well that we cannot at this time fully answer the question which I posed a moment ago: Why are we here? Our quest to understand the majesty and the meaning of creation has left us with a profound realization of our own limitations.

I said that the question “Why are we here?” answers itself because we cannot answer it. By that I mean that, at our present stage of development, our purpose is to answer it. And in order to do that, we must foster the continued upward evolution of our race.

If we are ever to understand the purpose of our lives and the destiny of the universe, if we are to answer my question of “why are we here?” then we most urgently need to surpass ourselves, to increase our understanding and our knowledge a hundred fold, a thousand fold, a million fold. And that is conceivable. I would even go so far as to say that it can be done.

But how? If, as I said, the best men of our race through all the ages have not done so, then how can I justify saying that it can ever be done? The answer is simple: The fact that the best men of our race represent the highest development of consciousness on this planet at this time is no reason to suppose that a higher development is not possible.

Aware of our limitations and of our inability to honestly and completely and certainly answer the ultimate question of meaning and purpose, we must see now with unblinking eyes the certainty that at our present stage of development, our mission, our purpose, must be to do whatever is necessary to continue this process of upward development. Our purpose must be to make possible the answering of those questions of meaning and purpose by laying the groundwork for a higher humanity, a higher consciousness, which will be able to answer those questions.

To fulfill this mission we will need better scientists, more profound philosophers, more creative inventors, and more responsible leaders than have ever existed before on planet Earth.

I ask you, ladies and gentleman, is that the direction that America and the West are taking today? Are we still advancing, still heading for the stars?

Or are we headed for the gutter?

Right and Wrong

What is our basis for saying that some acts are right and good and others are wrong? In other words, what is the basis of morality? Our answer to this question must not be at variance with our inborn moral sense nor must it be based on any absolutist dogma which cannot be carried out in the real world. For morality to have any meaning at all it must be a realistic guide to action. If you believe, as we do, that our purpose on this Earth is to continue on the upward path — to advance insofar as it is in our abilities to do so, the struggle for a higher, nobler consciousness — then the answer to that moral question becomes obvious.

First, we must realize that despite all our imperfections and shortcomings that the gene-patterns of our race represent the highest development that Nature has yet achieved. They are our most precious possession. Our present stage of development was reached through countless generations of struggle and natural selection — but it can be destroyed beyond any hope of repair or restoration by a single thoughtless and selfish generation. We must never allow that to happen. Nature’s gift to our people must be jealously guarded.

These gifts of mind and spirit and beauty which mark us as a race apart from the rest of mankind were obtained only as a result of a relentless winnowing of our people over hundreds of thousands of years in accord with Nature’s inflexible and unalterable law of survival of the fittest.

But our civilization and our technology have, over the last few millennia, largely shielded us from a continuation of this winnowing process, thus slowing or even reversing our upward development at the genetic level.

Armed with a love for our people, with the will to fulfill our destiny, and with our scientific knowledge, we can return our people to the upward path and become conscious agents of our own evolution.

In short, the answer to our moral question is this: Whatever is good for our people, for our race, in the long term, is good. Whatever will advance our race toward ever higher levels of physical and spiritual development, whatever brings us closer to that destiny which our Creator intends for us, is good. And whatever threatens the survival of our people, or which puts us on the downward path, is evil.

This moral standard must be relentlessly applied to every individual, to every institution, to every organization, to every religion, to every proposed program or course of action, and to every expenditure of time or money or blood in our entire society.

When seen through the lens of a true morality, the hypocrisy and treason and criminal waste of our time and our inheritance become painfully, almost unbearably obvious.

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Source: Author

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